The Galaxy Note 10 Plus will make its official debut tomorrow i.e. Wednesday, 7th August 2019 and although the rumored specs hint at the arrival of a powerful smartphone, there are signs that it will turn out to be a major disappointment.

As we have explained before, Samsung took it upon itself to overhaul the entire Note series this year and is launching two 4G and two 5G variants for the users but is missing out on many basic features that attract new users to a smartphone.

Let’s dive into the details and see why you should not have high hopes for Galaxy Note 10’s future:

Worn Out Camera Sensor

By prioritizing only the performance aspect of its phones, the company has missed the window to introduce any new camera upgrade for the consumers.

The Galaxy Note 10 Plus is expected to come with quad rear cameras including a 3D ToF sensor but even after increasing the number of cameras on its smartphones, the company still wouldn’t be able to stand out from the crowd due to its aged camera hardware.

In a series of tweets, industry leaker, Ice Universe has revealed that the Galaxy Note 10 Plus will be far behind the upcoming Huawei Mate 30 Pro as Samsung’s flagship phablet will be using the same 1/2.55-inch 1.4um CMOS camera module as the Galaxy S7 which was released in 2016.

Quite surprisingly, the Galaxy Note 10 Plus will be part of the eighth flagship series recycling the same camera sensor

Contrary to Samsung’s stagnant progress in the camera hardware department, Huawei, after the launch of best low-light camera phone (P30 Pro) earlier this year, is ready to once again make news by introducing two 40MP sensors in its upcoming Huawei Mate 30 Pro smartphone.

In a tweet, Ice Universe has shown the size difference between Huawei and Samsung’s camera sensors.

Galaxy Note 10 Plus camera sensor
Image Source: Ice Universe

He stated, “Note 10 has no chance of beating Mate 30 Pro in terms of camera hardware.” It should be noted that Huawei has been increasing the size of its camera sensors over the last three years- bigger the sensor, the more light it can have for better low-light photography.

Samsung’s deterrence in this aspect has now forced it to follow Huawei and Pixel to re-learn mobile phone photography.

No 45W Charging

Many of us were frankly looking forward to seeing 45W fast charging capability in the upcoming Galaxy Note 10 Plus but according to XDA Developer’s Max Weinbach, the South Korea smartphone maker has decided to play it safe with 25W fast charging feature.

Reportedly, Galaxy A90 will be Samsung’s first smartphone to launch with 45W fast charging which, to be honest, is confusing because the best things should come first to the flagship phones-dictates the rules of the tech world.

A different rumor suggests that the Plus version of the device will support 45W fast charging but the user will have to pay extra as the phone will only come with 25W charger in the box.

Knowing that the Galaxy Note 10 Plus will cost an arm and a leg, it is quite risky for a company to demand extra money from its users for a charging boost.

Radical Design Shift

The renders of Galaxy Note 10 Plus show a punch-hole camera in the top-center of the display and though the idea makes us wince at the moment, the jury is still out whether it is a wise decision by Samsung or an injustice to the phone’s large screen.

What scares us the most is the independent tweets from Max Weinbach and Steve Hemmerstoffer (co-owner of Slashleaks and a reputable leaker) claiming that the phone will look much worse than what the concept designs and renders have shown us so far.

Bye Bye Headphones

The sudden removal of the headphone jack from Galaxy Note 10 Plus will be a shock to many loyal users especially when the Galaxy S10 series still have this feature.

For years, Samsung has employed the formula of launching a new feature in its flagship S series and then trickle it down to the Note series. Sadly, the company didn’t give the Galaxy Note users a time to adjust to the idea of either moving on to dongle-filled life or a wireless one.


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